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Bals J-C, Christ F, Engels G and Erwig M (2007), "ClassSheets - model-based, object-oriented design of spreadsheet applications", Journal of Object Technology., In Proceedings of the TOOLS Europe Conference (TOOLS 2007), Zürich (Swiss)., October , 2007. Vol. 6, pp. 383-398. Journal of Object Technology.
Abstract: Using spreadsheets is the preferred method to calculate, display or store anything that fits into a table-like structure. They are often used by end users to create applications. But they have one critical drawback - they are very error-prone.To reduce the error-proneness, we purpose a new way of object-oriented modeling of spreadsheets prior to using them. These spreadsheet models, termed ClassSheets, are used to generate concrete spreadsheets on the instance level.By this approach sources of errors are reduced and spreadsheet applications are easier to understand.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Bals07,
  author = {Jan-Christopher Bals AND Fabian Christ AND Gregor Engels AND Martin Erwig},
  title = {ClassSheets - model-based, object-oriented design of spreadsheet applications},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the TOOLS Europe Conference (TOOLS 2007), Zürich (Swiss)},
  journal = {Journal of Object Technology},
  publisher = {Journal of Object Technology},
  year = {2007},
  volume = {6},
  pages = {383--398},
  doi = {http://www.jot.fm/issues/issue_2007_10/paper19/index.html}
}
Engels G and Erwig M (2005), "ClassSheets: automatic generation of spreadsheet applications from object-oriented specifications", In Proceedings of the 20th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE 2005), Long Beach, CA (USA). New York, NY, USA, November, 2005. , pp. 124-133. ACM Press.
Abstract: Spreadsheets are widely used in all kinds of business applications.Numerous studies have shown that they contain manyerrors that sometimes have dramatic impacts. One reasonfor this situation is the low-level, cell-oriented developmentprocess of spreadsheets.We improve this process by introducing and formalizinga higher-level object-oriented model termed ClassSheet.While still following the tabular look-and-feel of spreadsheets,ClassSheets allow the developer to express explicitlybusiness object structures within a spreadsheet, whichis achieved by integrating concepts from the UML (UnifiedModeling Language). A stepwise automatic transformationprocess generates a spreadsheet application that is consistentwith the ClassSheet model. Thus, by deploying theformal underpinning of ClassSheets, a large variety of errorscan be prevented that occur in many existing spreadsheetapplications today.The presented ClassSheet approach links spreadsheet applicationsto the object-oriented modeling world and advocatesan automatic model-driven development process forspreadsheet applications of high quality.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{Engels2005d,
  author = {Gregor Engels AND Martin Erwig},
  title = {ClassSheets: automatic generation of spreadsheet applications from object-oriented specifications},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 20th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering (ASE 2005), Long Beach, CA (USA)},
  publisher = {ACM Press},
  year = {2005},
  pages = {124--133}
}
Chambers C, Erwig M and Luckey M (2010), "SheetDiff: A Tool for Identifying Changes in Spreadsheets", In Proceedings of the 26th IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing 2010 (VL/HCC 2010). Washington, DC, USA, September, 2010. , pp. 85-92. IEEE Computer Society.
Abstract: Most spreadsheets, like other software, change over time. A frequentlyoccurring scenario is the repeated reuse and adaptation of spreadsheets fromone project to another. If several versions of one spreadsheet forgrading/budgeting/etc. have accumulated, it is often not obvious which one tochoose for the next project. In situations like these, an understanding of howtwo versions of a spreadsheet differ is crucial to make aninformed choice. Other scenarios are the reconciliation of two spreadsheetscreated by different users, generalizing different spreadsheets into a commontemplate, or simply understanding and documenting the evolution of aspreadsheet over time.In this paper we present a method for identifying the changes between twospreadsheets with the explicit goal of presenting them to users in a conciseform. We have implemented a prototype system, called SheetDiff, and testedthe approach on several different spreadsheet pairs. As our evaluations willshow, this system works reliably in practice. Moreover, we have comparedSheetDiff to similar systems that are commercially available. An importantdifference is that while all these other tools distribute the changerepresentation over two spreadsheets, our system displays all changes in thecontext of one spreadsheet, which results in a more compact representation.
BibTeX:
@inproceedings{SheetDiff10,
  author = {Chris Chambers AND Martin Erwig AND Markus Luckey},
  editor = {Chr. Hundhausen, E. Pietriga, P. Diaz, M. B. Rosson},
  title = {SheetDiff: A Tool for Identifying Changes in Spreadsheets},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 26th IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing 2010 (VL/HCC 2010)},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  year = {2010},
  pages = {85--92}
}